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Mycorporation Coupon, Coupon Codes & Promotional Codes October 2019

MyCorporation Coupon Codes Archive

We keep an archive of our old MyCorporation & sales here so that you can see what kind of discounts they offer. Online retailers mostly reuse old codes, so you can always try them just in case.



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We keep all coupon banners of MyCorporation codes & sales here so that you can see what kind of discounts they offer throw using banner ads. Online retailers mostly use banner advertisement, so you can always try them just in case.



MyCorporation Sales

This list is comprised exclusively of all the current MyCorporation sales for October 2019, so you can easily see when there are sales savings to be had.



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Here's our current MyCorporation free shipping codes for October 2019. Grab them whenever you're shopping at MyCorporation to save money on costly shipping and returns.



Free Incorporation guide, Free Simple Start Why MyCorporation Why MyCorporation? ...

Free Incorporation guide, Free Simple Start with LLC or Incorporation filing Why MyCorporation Why MyCorporation? Expertise: We've helped 125,000+ small businesses and real estate investors incorporate or form LLCs Service: Your business matters.  You are never just a number to MyCorporation Peace of Mind: We take care of the filing, ensuring all state requirements are met, so you can focus on your business Help me choose which entity is right for me. FREE Incorporation Guide FREE Simple Start with your LLC or Incorporation filing  

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Kevin and Ben share their LLC story MyCorporation: Kevin and Ben FREE Incorporation Guide |...

Kevin and Ben share their LLC story MyCorporation: Kevin and Ben FREE Incorporation Guide | C-Corporation | S-Corporation Limited Liability| Non-Profit Corporation | Professional Corporation Why Incorporate? Show me the comparison chart. Help me choose which entity is right for me. Kevin Reeth & Ben Curren Web Development Services About Esomnie, LLC: Home Base: Sunnyvale, CA Most Productive Time of Day: 9-11pm after kids are sleeping Favorite Power Lunch: Chicken wraps with feta, cucumbers, tomatoes, etc. Challenge: Forming a Partnership Kevin and Ben had many years of web development expertise and an eagerness to build easy to use web applications. They wanted a legal agreement to define their partnership and protect their personal assets if the business were sued. The Solution: Kevin and Ben read samples of legal documents on the web, talked with others entrepreneurs, and talked with an attorney. The attorney advised them to draft key partnership terms around decision making, division of company profits, and partner departure plans to enable him to craft a formal partnership agreement. In their search for asset protection documents, they found an operating agreement for an LLC (Limited Liability Company) on MyCorporation.com which had asset protection coverage as well as partnership terms. With this document from MyCorporation.com, they formalized their partnership terms and protected their assets without having to retain an attorney. What other MyCorporation customers are saying... "MyCorporation is amazing! It was fast, easy and affordable. The Impeccable staff has great follow-up, listening skills, professionalism, and someone always picks up the phone. Highly recommended!" Novak Investments Corp Wayne Novak, Tucson AZ “MyCorporation helped me go through a change that I was not looking forward to, but with their help, it was resolved on time. ... I was able to take care of my future and gain the new enterprise...” T3 Enterprises, LLC Daniel P. Threatt, Antioch TN Courtesy of www.JumpUp.com –a free website and community from MyCorporation, a company that helps new businesses start and succeed.

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MyCorporation vs. other business filing services MyCorporation: Competitive Comparison Chart See...

MyCorporation vs. other business filing services MyCorporation: Competitive Comparison Chart See How We Compare to Other Incorporation Filing Services   MyCorporation Other online business filing services Over 10 years of service √ Some online providers have been in operation for less than a year. Be careful of online ‘fly by night’ operators. Small business expertise √ Our focus is small business. Other companies, such as legalzoom™, spread their resources across personal products also. Intuit’s expansive product line within QuickBooks® stands as a testament to our commitment in revolutionizing the way people manage their small businesses. State Forms Requirement Assurance √ Other sites may give you pricing for your state, but do not list the comprehensive state-specific requirements as part of the interview process. Displays REAL fees Yes Other sites may mislead the viewer, while we clearly state the real fees for rush orders and each state. Easy, over-the-phone assistance √ Some sites limit access or visibility to personal support, while MyCorporation is very clear that our U.S.-based agents are available for FREE UNLIMITED Toll-Free or E-mail support. Processing time 24 hours Other sites do not give a commitment to beginning the filing process or personally confirming an order within 24 hours of receiving an application. Complete turnaround time* (Inc. or LLC) 5 to 45 business days State filing times vary by state, but other online providers fail to list turnaround time. At MyCorporation, our filing experts will keep you updated every step of the way. Product Breadth LLCIncorporations Post-formations (DBA, EIN, Foreign Qualification) Trademarks Copyrights My IncGuardTM Compliance Management alerts Do not have the breadth of products or services to manage and maintain your LLC or incorporation as well. We offer a complete line of legal business filing services. FREE QuickBooks Simple Start Yes No FREE Inc or LLC Guide Yes The typical online filing service does not provide these materials. Featured in articles (e.g., forbes.com) Yes Majority of online competitors has not received public acknowledgment of their services. Backed by solid parent company Intuit, the makers of QuickBooks and TurboTax Majority of other online filing services are private businesses with questionable experience. *Includes state filing time What MyCorporation clients are saying:   "MyCorporation is amazing! It was fast, easy and affordable. The Impeccable staff has great follow-up, listening skills, professionalism, and someone always picks up the phone. Highly recommended!" Novak Investments Corp Wayne Novak, Tucson AZ “MyCorporation helped me go through a change that I was not looking forward to, but with their help, it was resolved on time. ... I was able to take care of my future and gain the new enterprise...” T3 Enterprises, LLC Daniel P. Threatt, Antioch TN

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Myths behind business naming MyCorporation: Business Naming Myth Blasters Business Naming Myth...

Myths behind business naming MyCorporation: Business Naming Myth Blasters Business Naming Myth Blasters Why Incorporate? Show me the comparison chart. Help me choose which entity is right for me. Myth #1: If someone uses your business name as a Web site address, you can demand ownership of that domain name You would think this would be so, but the reality is much more complicated. Sometimes you can approach domain registration companies about acquiring a name that is already being used—but these companies don't have to transfer ownership. And be careful about approaching the owner of a Web address, because that person just might ask for a briefcase full of cash to transfer the domain name. Instead, you may need to find an attorney to help you—if you really think it's worth the legal effort. In cases like this, you may need to think about coming up with a domain name that is similar to your business name—or think about other possibilities for naming your company. Myth #2: The effort of researching an ideal business name takes too much time from starting a business Discovering the right name for a business can be one of the most rewarding—and fun—entrepreneurial activities around. Besides, you'll save more time in the long run by having an appropriate name that you actually own. For one thing, a good name will make your business attractive to customers and investors, and you'll want to spare yourself the embarrassment of explaining a name that doesn't make much sense for your venture. Myth #3: The name of a small business name should include a reference to location and the services or products sold Sometimes. If you think you'll be doing business in once place, then names like "Youngstown Zeppelin Service" and "Tri—Valley Blast Furnace Cleaners" make sense. But consider your long—term plans. Where will your business be a year from now—or five or ten years from now? Will you still be in just one location? And will you offer more than one product or service? Possibly—so you may want to think big and give yourself a name that will grow with your business. Myth #4: You can get a lot of recognition out of using a name that sounds similar to a familiar brand name This is true, but it probably won't be the kind of recognition you want. If it can be proved that you intentionally made your business name sound like that of another company, you could be in for some legal trouble. That's why names like "Intell," "Dizney," and "General Motor" are likely to catch the attention of corporate lawyers who spend their time looking out for companies that appear to infringe on band names. Myth #5: You can make your business name seem more established by adding "LLC" or "Inc." Sometimes true, but you'd also better make sure that your company is actually a limited liability company (LLC) or incorporated as a corporation. These are legal terms showing that a company is doing business in a particular way, and you can't just add these designations to your business name without actually having formed an LLC or corporation. Myth #6: If a business name you like is taken by another company, that name can't be used You'd think so, but it depends. If the business name is trademarked, then you can't use that particular name. However, if a company has the same name that you'd like to use, or a similar one, and hasn't trademarked it, you may be able to use it if: The other company does not provide the same services as your business The other company is located in another county or state You're using your own personal name as a business name This is a situation where you may need to consult a trademark lawyer to make sure you can use a particular name. Myth #7: You must always register your business name It's a good idea to register your business name for the sake of protection, but it's not always necessary. For example, sole proprietorships and general partnerships that use the names of their owners are not always required to file or register when the business name is the same as the owner's. LLCs and corporations always submit business names with their articles of incorporation. But regardless of the requirements of your business structure, registering your business name will help you avoid a situation where you may be forced to rename your venture. Myth #8: You can find all business names in government name registers Not true for two reasons. First, we still haven't reached the point where all information is easily found in one central repository. And secondly, the government really isn't everywhere. You'll be able to find registered businesses in government name registers, but many businesses are not registered. While these companies may not legally own their names, you don't want to be confused with another business. That's why doing Internet searches will help you narrow down your list of potential business names. Myth #9: You can trademark just about any word or phrase Sometimes it seems that way, but the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has pretty stringent guidelines to make sure people can't trademark commonly used words and phrases. The same goes for secretary of state offices at the state level if you plan to register your trademark regionally. For example, common and ordinary names—such as Smith's Hardware or Tom's Gourmet Sandwiches—aren't distinctive enough to receive trademark protection. Names such as FedEx, Quicken, and Xerox, however, are distinctive enough to receive trademark protection. Also keep in mind that a common—sounding company name can be trademarked when it is used in conjunction with a particular product. For example, McDonald's is a trademarked name when it is used to market hamburgers—but not things like office supplies and vinyl siding. Myth #10: Adding the ™ or ® symbol to your company name protects you from other businesses trying to use the same name Although you can add ™ to your business name if you believe you have the right to use it, if you're serious about protecting your name, apply for trademark protection. Ideally, you should do this before using the ™ symbol. If someone does contest ownership of the name, you'll have the better claim if you have already started the registration process. Using the ® symbol is an entirely different story, because it is reserved only for companies that have actually had their trademark registered. Until your name is registered, don't use ®—otherwise it will stand for "regrets" instead of "registered." Why Incorporate? Show me the comparison chart. Help me choose which entity is right for me. Courtesy of www.JumpUp.com –a free website and community from MyCorporation, a company that helps new businesses start and succeed.

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Case studies/ testimonials of customer experiences MyCorporation: Case Studies FREE Incorporation...

Case studies testimonials of customer experiences with MyCorporation MyCorporation: Case Studies FREE Incorporation Guide | C-Corporation | S-Corporation Limited Liability| Non-Profit Corporation | Professional Corporation Why Incorporate? Show me the comparison chart. Help me choose which entity is right for me. Case Study for a C-Corporation Gabby and her two best friends, decide to start a company that develops personal budget software for smart phones.  They are excellent programmers and developers, not to mention business people, so there is a good chance they will take their company public in the future.  They decide they will call their company “G3 Development” and that they will divide all the profits and liabilities of the company equally among the three of them.  Since issuing stock and potentially going public is a requirement of Gabby and her friends, they decide to form a general-for-profit corporation or C-Corporation. Case Study for an S-Corporation Derek has his own consulting business and recently has become concerned about protecting his personal assets. Derek wants to form a corporation for the limited liability protection but is concerned about the double taxation of corporations. Derek much prefers the pass through tax advantages of the LLC but really wants to be an “Inc.” Therefore, Derek looked into S-Corporation election which offers the same pass through taxation as LLCs. Derek formed a corporation and elected S-Corporation status with the IRS. By doing this, Derek has able to still be an “Inc.” while also avoiding the double taxation and having the pass-through tax advantages. Case Study for a Limited Liability Company (LLC) Nathan has been planning on starting a catering business.  In anticipation of getting his operation going he has decided to form the company “Nathan’s Nutrition.” He likes the liability protection of a corporation but he doesn’t want to deal with the annual reports, bylaws, distribution of shares, and all the other things that come with operating a corporation.  He decides to form a LLC which gives him liability protection similar to a corporation but doesn’t have the formalities of a corporation.  The LLC also gives the benefit of having all the profits and losses to pass directly through to him. Case Study for a Non-Profit Corporation After a lifelong battle with restless leg syndrome, and dealing with the difficulties of diagnosing and treating this issue, David decided to start a corporation in order to aid those who are working on this cause. Since David’s primary objection is to support medical advances and does not want to gain a profit, he decides to set up a non-profit corporation. Further, by forming a nonprofit corporation, David can apply to the IRS for tax exempt status, thereby making all donations tax deductible. Case Study for a Professional Corporation Omar has just finished his dental residency and is ready to start his own practice.  Omar decides to form a corporation to protect his personal assets and give his practice some credibility.   However, Omar’s state requires that all health professionals form “professional corporations” because he will be organized for the purpose of providing professional services.   Unlike a regular corporation, professionals are not absolved for personal liability for their own acts of malpractice or negligence. Therefore, Omar remains liable for his own acts or malpractice but receives limited liability for malpractice of other partners, tort liability (i.e. slip and falls) and business debts.   What MyCorporation customers are saying... " MyCorporation is amazing! It was fast, easy and affordable. The Impeccable staff has great follow-up, listening skills, professionalism, and someone always picks up the phone. Highly recommended!" Novak Investments Corp Wayne Novak, Tucson AZ “MyCorporation helped me go through a change that I was not looking forward to, but with their help, it was resolved on time. ... I was able to take care of my future and gain the new enterprise...” T3 Enterprises, LLC Daniel P. Threatt, Antioch TN

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How to name your business MyCorporation: Winning the Name Game Winning the Name Game Why...

How to name your business MyCorporation: Winning the Name Game Winning the Name Game Why Incorporate? Show me the comparison chart. Help me choose which entity is right for me. Registering Your Business Name Finding and registering your business name is an essential first step in creating your own distinctive brand. Check for Availability of Your Business Name After you come up with a list of possible names for your new venture, make sure that you find an available business name. For one thing, you don't want anyone to confuse your business with another company. And you certainly want to avoid any situation where some big corporation decides that you're infringing on its name and then gives you a lot of legal grief. Below you'll find a guide to determining availability and registering your name. Research names in government databases and on the Internet To make sure your business is never confused with another company, conduct a thorough name and trademark search. To find out whether your proposed business name is available, start with the alphabetical business listings in the White Pages. If the names you like aren't there, continue your search using: Fictitious name databases, which can be found in your county clerk's office and should hold all the names under which local companies do business. In some states, there are statewide fictitious name databases. When you decide on a name, you'll want to register it this way, too. If a name you like is already taken by someone else in a different part of the state, but not in your county, you may be able to use it as well. Ask the people who work for the county clerk's office or the people in your state's secretary of state office. Corporation, limited liability corporation (LLC), and limited partnership name databases, which can be found in state filing offices and are now often online. Whether or not your business is one of these types of companies, you'll want to make sure that the name you want isn't taken by some other company in these databases. Why? These companies can be a pain when they think a name comes close to what they call themselves. Searching these databases can avoid potential problems. The Internet is a superb research tool. It may not always give you access to business names in government databases, but using popular search engines will help you narrow your list of names. It also helps to use advanced search options you'll find with these services, or you may get information about things that have little to do with a family business. As you do your research, keep in mind that even if a business in another state or county has the same name you want, it doesn't mean a particular name is off-limits. You may only need to make sure that a particular name isn't trademarked and doesn't represent a company offering the same things as your business. Researching trademarked names will protect your business And speaking of trademarks, that little ™ symbol often stands for something pretty big. Legally it can stand for a word, phrase, design, or symbol used to market a product or service-if the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) says so. Most states register trademarks for regional businesses through their secretary of state offices. Also, you should know that the ™ symbol means that a company claims ownership of a particular name, while an ® symbol means that the name has been registered and is definitely owned by someone else. Getting your business online means reserving a name on the Internet If you plan on having a Web site for your business, then you'll want to have a domain name that will at least reflect part of the name of your new venture. Because people increasingly look online for businesses, what you discover on the Internet may help you narrow down your naming choices. You may also want to consider going back to your earlier research to see if any of the business names you're considering are already used as Web site addresses. All of this also helps keep other businesses from horning in on what you plan to offer. Registering your business name makes it official You're going to feel like celebrating once you find an available and appropriate name, because your business idea will have just taken an important first step toward becoming reality. In fact, if you plan to run a sole proprietorship or general partnership, you may already be there if your business name is the same as your own given name, as in "Henry Gorman, Balloon Artist. If you plan on operating under a name that isn't the same as your own, you'll need to register a fictitious business name with your county clerk. And if you're starting a corporation, LLC, or limited partnership, your official business name will be automatically registered when you file your articles of incorporation, articles of organization, or statement of limited partnership with your state filing office You may also want to trademark your business name (and, later, the logos and other designs you use to represent your venture) in your state or on the federal level. Courtesy of www.JumpUp.com –a free website and community from MyCorporation, Intuit that helps new businesses start and succeed.

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Save 2% Off + Delivery Chart

Entity Comparison Chart MyCorporation: Entity Definitions FREE Incorporation Guide | C-Corporation | S-Corporation Limited Liability| Non-Profit Corporation | Professional Corporation Entity Type Main Advantages Main Drawbacks Regular C-Corporation File Online Now Owners have limited personal liability for business debts. Fringe benefits can be deducted as business expense. Owners can split corporate profit among owners and corporation, paying lower overall tax rate. More expensive to create than partnership or sole proprietorship. Paperwork can seem burdensome Separate taxable entity. S-Corporation File Online Now Owners have limited personal liability for business debts. Owners report their share of corporate profit or loss on their personal tax returns. Owners can use corporate loss to offset income from other sources. More expensive to create than partnership or sole proprietorship. More paperwork than for a limited liability company which offers similar advantages. Income must be allocated to owners according to their ownership interests. Fringe benefits limited for owners who own more than 2% of shares Professional Corporation File Online Now Owners have no personal liability for malpractice of other owners. More expensive to create Paperwork can seem burdensome All owners must belong to the same profession. Non-Profit Corporation File Online Now Corporation doesn't pay income taxes. Contributions to charitable corporation are tax-deductible. Fringe benefits can be deducted as business expense. Full tax advantages available only to groups organized for charitable, scientific, educational, literary or religious purposes. Property transferred to corporation stays there; if corporation ends, property must go to another nonprofit. Limited Liability Company File Online Now Combines a corporation's protection from personal liability for business debts and pass-through tax structure of a partnership. Significantly easier to maintain than a corporation. IRS rules now allow LLCs to choose between being taxed as partnership or corporation. More expensive to create than a partnership State laws for creating LLCs may not reflect latest federal tax changes. Professional Limited Liability Company   Same advantages as a regular limited liability company. Gives state licensed professionals a way to enjoy those advantages. Same as for a regular limited liability company. Members must all belong to the same profession. Limited Liability Partnership   Mostly of interest to partners in old line professions such as law, medicine and accounting. Owners (partners) aren't personally liable for the malpractice of other partners. Owners report their share of profit or loss on their personal tax returns. Owners (partners) remain personally liable for many types of obligations owed to business creditors, lenders and landlords. Not available in all states. Often limited to a short list of professions. Sole Proprietorship   Simple and inexpensive to create and operate. Owner reports profit or loss on his or her personal tax return. Owner personally liable for business debts. General Partnership   Simple and inexpensive to create and operate. Owner (partners) reports profit or loss on his or her personal tax returns. Owner (partners) personally liable for business debts. Limited Partnership   Limited partners have limited personal liability for business debts as long as they don't participate in management. General partners can raise cash without involving outside investors in management of business. General partners personally liable for business debts. More expensive to create than general partnership. Suitable mainly for companies that invest in real estate. document.write('' ); _uacct = "UA-2011483-2"; urchinTracker();

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Incorporation and Filing DBA Papers MyCorporation: Incorporation and Filing Incorporation and...

Incorporation and Filing DBA Papers MyCorporation: Incorporation and Filing DBA Incorporation and Filing DBA Papers: Sole Proprietorship, Limited Liability Co., or Corporation - Choosing the Right Option Why Incorporate? Show me the entity comparison chart. Help me choose which entity is right for me. What kind of new business do you plan to start? Sure, you know what your business will do, but for legal reasons, you also need to figure out how to structure your company. It's a pretty important consideration, because you'll be thinking about how much liability protection you need, as well as how much paperwork you'll have to do. Below you'll find information about defining your company as a sole proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company (LLC), or corporation. How to keep the structure simple For many new businesses, the best initial ownership structure is often either a sole proprietorship or a partnership. A sole proprietorship is a one-person company. Usually you don't have to do anything special or file papers to set one up. If you own the business with someone else, then a partnership may be the answer. This simple arrangement usually doesn't require filing paperwork, either. The arrangement begins as soon as you start a business with another person. As far as the law goes, sole proprietorships and partnerships are one and the same as the people who own these businesses. As the owner of one of these companies, you report business income and losses on your personal tax returns, and are personally liable for any business-related obligations, such as debts or court judgments. Potentially limiting Limited Partnerships You may have heard of limited partnerships, which are a little more complicated. Limited partnerships are typically created by one person, called the general partner, who arranges investments from other people, called limited partners. These relationships between the general partner and the limited partners can be very complex. Incorporation options Incorporation makes sense for many entrepreneurs because it protects you, the business owner, from having your personal assets - such as your home, personal bank accounts, and vehicles - put at risk if something turns sour. In legalese, this concept is known as "limited liability." Typically, there are three options available: C-corporation: You can think of a C-corporation (the technical name for a regular corporation) as having just about the same legal and tax status as a person. Owners don't use their personal income tax returns to pay tax on corporate profits. The corporation itself shells out the cash to the government, often at a lower rate than what the owners of other kinds of businesses pay. Setting up and running a corporation, however, means a fair amount of paperwork and formality, such as completing forms covering officers of the company and recording minutes of regularly scheduled meetings. LLC (limited liability company): Like corporations, LLCs provide limited personal liability for business debts and claims, which can be a real help for a new business. But when it comes to taxes, LLCs are more like partnerships, because owners report business income on their personal tax returns. This arrangement doesn't require as much formal structure as a regular corporation, which is one reason why it can be a good choice for a new business. S-corporation: Like an LLC, an S-corporation provides all the limited liability of a regular corporation, while the owners are also taxed for business income. But unlike an LLC, S-corporations must first be regular corporations before applying for this unique tax-paying status - and continue following all other corporate regulations. All of this translates into a business structure that requires careful consideration and even expert advice before starting. Making your business structure official If you start your business as a corporation, LLC, or limited partnership, you'll need to file organizational documents such as articles of incorporation with the right office in your state. Depending on the state in which you form your business, this will run you anywhere from about $80 to $800. Many states have forms and sample documents online. The actual filing is usually done through your state's department of corporations or secretary of state's office. There's nothing phony about a fictitious business name You may not have to do any filing if you're planning to start a sole proprietorship or a partnership. But even if this is your plan, you should investigate whether you need to apply for a fictitious business name. This fishy-sounding term is also known as a DBA, which is short for "doing business as," and is simply the operating name of your business. If your business name is not the same as your own personal name, you will need to file a fictitious business name. The reason for a DBA, as far as the government is concerned, is to keep track of companies in the event of a complaint or legal problem. The registration process is very straightforward and is usually handled by the county clerk in the county where you plan to start your business. Once this is taken care of, you can do things under your business name, like open a business checking account.

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